Is the biochip the Mark of the Beast?

    



Is the biochip the Mark of the Beast?
The biochip technology was originally developed in 1983 for monitoring fisheries, it’s use now includes, over 300 zoos, over 80 government agencies in at least 20 countries, pets (everything from lizards to dogs), electronic "branding" of horses, monitoring lab animals, fisheries, endangered wildlife, automobiles, garment tracking, hazardous waste, and according to the experts – humans. To date, over 7 million animals have been "chipped". The major biochip companies are A.V.I.D. (American Veterinary Identification Devices), Trovan Identification Systems, and Destron-Fearing Corporation.
And according to most modern-day "prophecy teachers". . . the implanted biochip is the soon-coming, 666: Mark of the Beast.

What is The Biochip Technology?

What is a biochip implant? The current, in use, biochip implant system is actually a fairly simple device. Today’s, biochip implant is basically a small (micro) computer chip, inserted under the skin, for identification purposes. The biochip implant system consists of two components; a transponder and a reader or scanner. The transponder is the actual biochip implant. The biochip system is a radio frequency identification (RFID) system, using low-frequency radio signals to communicate between the biochip and reader. The reading range or activation range, between reader and biochip is small, normally between 2 and 12 inches.
Note, we are only examining the implanted "biochips", there are many other RFID microchip systems available.
The transponder: The transponder is the actual biochip implant. It is a passive transponder, meaning it contains no battery or energy of it's own. In comparison, an active transponder would provide it’s own energy source, normally a small battery. Because the passive biochip contains no battery, or nothing to wear out, it has a very long life, up to 99 years, and no maintenance. Being passive, it's inactive until the reader activates it by sending it a low-power electrical charge. The reader "reads" or "scans" the implanted biochip and receives back data (in this case an identification number) from the biochip. The communication between biochip and reader is via low-frequency radio waves.
The biochip-transponder consists of four parts; computer microchip, antenna coil, capacitor and the glass capsule.



   
PERSPECTIVE OF
THE ACTUAL SIZE
Computer Microchip: The microchip stores a unique identification number from 10 to 15 digits long. The storage capacity of the current microchips is limited, capable of storing only a single ID number. AVID (American Veterinary Identification Devices), claims their chips, using a nnn-nnn-nnn format, has the capability of over 70 trillion unique numbers. The unique ID number is "etched" or encoded via a laser onto the surface of the microchip before assembly. Once the number is encoded it is impossible to alter. The microchip also contains the electronic circuitry necessary to transmit the ID number to the "reader".
Antenna Coil: This is normally a simple, coil of copper wire around a ferrite or iron core. This tiny, primitive, radio antenna "receives and sends" signals from the reader or scanner.
Tuning Capacitor: The capacitor stores the small electrical charge (less than 1/1000 of a watt) sent by the reader or scanner, which activates the transponder. This "activation" allows the transponder to send back the ID number encoded in the computer chip. Because "radio waves" are utilized to communicate between the transponder and reader, the capacitor is "tuned" to the same frequency as the reader.
Glass Capsule: The glass capsule "houses" the microchip, antenna coil and capacitor. It is a small capsule, the smallest measuring 11 mm in length and 2 mm in diameter, about the size of an uncooked grain of rice. The capsule is made of biocompatible material such as soda lime glass. After assembly, the capsule is hermetically (air-tight) sealed, so no bodily fluids can touch the electronics inside. Because the glass is very smooth and susceptible to movement, a material such as a polypropylene polymer sheath is attached to one end of the capsule. This sheath provides a compatible surface which the bodily tissue fibers bond or interconnect, resulting in a permanent placement of the biochip.




BIOCHIP AND SYRINGE
The biochip is inserted into the subject with a hypodermic syringe. Injection is safe and simple, comparable to common vaccines. Anesthesia is not required nor recommended. In dogs and cats, the biochip is usually injected behind the neck between the shoulder blades. Trovan, Ltd., markets an implant, featuring a patented "zip quill", which you simply press in, no syringe is needed. According to AVID "Once implanted, the identity tag is virtually impossible to retrieve. . . The number can never be altered."
THE READER or SCANNER

Notice the ID number
in the LCD display.
The reader: The reader consists of an "exciter" coil which creates an electromagnetic field that, via radio signals, provides the necessary energy (less than 1/1000 of a watt) to "excite" or "activate" the implanted biochip. The reader also carries a receiving coil that receives the transmitted code or ID number sent back from the "activated" implanted biochip. This all takes place very fast, in milliseconds. The reader also contains the software and components to decode the received code and display the result in an LCD display. The reader can include a RS-232 port to attach a computer.
How it works
The reader generates a low-power, electromagnetic field, in this case via radio signals, which "activates" the implanted biochip. This "activation" enables the biochip to send the ID code back to the reader via radio signals. The reader amplifies the received code, converts it to digital format, decodes and displays the ID number on the reader's LCD display. The reader must normally be between 2 and 12 inches near the biochip to communicate. The reader and biochip can communicate through most materials, except metal.
Are humans being biochipped?


As early as 1967, author Alan Westin was "warning" the possiblity of humans being "electronically tagged". In the "bible" of "Privacy and Freedom" Westin writes:
"As the microelectronic circuits and microminiature components now available in space work and laboratory experiments filter into general use, such tags will become available in much smaller sizes, increasing still further the possibilities for secreting them in an individual's clothing or his personal and professional accessories. Receiving or scanning units will also grow more powerful and smaller, making it easier for investigators to carry them in concealed form on their persons. . . . Invisible magnetic-ink tattoos might be applied (for example, to babies at birth) to provide permanent identification of every individual; these might possibly be used also for locating a subject. Existing microminiaturized transmitters the size of a pinhead might be coded with an identification number, enclosed in a permanent capsule, and implanted under the skin by a simple and painless surgical operation." (Privacy and Freedon, Alan F. Westin, 1967, pp. 85-86)
There is no question, biochips are "silently" inching into humans. For instance, at least 6 million medical devices, such as artificial body parts (prosthetic devices), breast implants, chin implants, etc., are implanted in people each year. And most of these medical devices are carrying a "surprize" guest — a biochip. In 1993, the Food and Drug Administration passed the Safe Medical Devices Registration Act of 1993, requiring all artificial body implants to have "implanted" identification — the biochip. So, the yearly, 6 million recipients of prosthetic devices and breast implants are "biochipped". ADS (Applied Digital Solutions), a major player in internet e-commerce and America's 5th fastest growing technology company, recently acquired the patent rights to the "world's first human implantable digital device". The implantable device is named "Digital Angel". According to ADS, it is "the world's first digital device — implantable in humans — with applicatons in E-business to business security, health care and criminal justice. Inserted just under the skin, with maintenance-free regenerating power supply, miniature 'Digital Angel' has multi-billion dollar market potential." And according to the patent abstract, "The device is small enough to be implanted in a child, facilitating use as a safeguard against kidnapping "

  • Applied Digital Solutions (ADS) Press Release



  • Yahoo Business Wire Reporting on Digital Angel



  • Detailed ADS Patent Specs - PDF Format



  • U.S. Patent Info on ADS Device
  • If anyone could truthfully answer the question — are humans currently being "biochipped"? — it would certainly be Donald G. Small, of Hughes Identification Devices. Hughes Identification Devices is one of the pioneers and largest suppliers of biochip implants.
    "We are not part of a military program to implant tags in humans. In fact, we are not part of any program to implant tags in humans, but a glass encapsulated animal tag only begs the question of the definition of what type of animal, and if that definition is a ‘mammal,’ certainly it would include man. Are there humans running around somewhere on the globe with tags — RFID tags — implanted in them? Yes! Absolutely, conclusively so."
    (Mark of the New World Order video, Virtue Productions)
    The first "verified" human receiving a biochip is the highly publicized Kevin Warwick, professor of Cybernetics at the University of Readings in the UK. Warwick received a biochip in his arm that enabled doors to open, turn on-off lights, basically a high-tech-cyber-remote-control. Warwick told ABC's Good Morning America (August 30, 1998), "People have been looking at the possibility of humans and silicon chips coming together for some time. And it seemed about time to actually have a go at it."
    Would you consider having microchips implanted in your body? Are people ready to "receive" a biochip? Is the world "tuned" to "receive" a biochip?
    When the Social Security program was enacted in 1935, the public was skeptical. Most people, at first, refused to be "numbered". Less than 40 years ago, something as "seemingly innocent" as receiving a social security number was met with hesitance and alarm.
    What a difference, a "quick" 40 years of credit cards, smart cards, satellitles, computers and the "information revolution" makes!
    Is the public "ripe" for a biochip?
    Ann Cavoukian and Don Tapscott, writes in their excellant book, Who Knows: Safeguarding Your Privacy in a Networked World:
    Such a microchip [biochip implant] may strike some of you as a gimmick, but two doctors in the United States recently had a microchip containing their respective medical histories implanted in their bodies, as part of a trial. House pets in Europe and North America are routinely implanted with microchips that identify their owners. When a group of internationally renowned privacy experts met to discuss the privacy implications of the information highway, they expressed concern that 'these tracking systems will be adapted to humans. The conversion would not be difficult'. Among the many who shared this view was Simon Davies, the director general of Privacy International, who was dismayed that a number of professionals he had spoken to would not object to such a tracking system. . . (Ann Cavoukian and Don Tapscott, Who Knows: Safeguarding Your Privacy in a Networked World, pp. 83-84)
    Linda LeSabre, singer of the rock group Death Ride 69, says:
    "I love technology, and to me it's not moving fast enough. I think it would kick a__ to have all the things like implants and upgrades because the human body is okay, but it certainly doesn't have the incredible hyper-capabilities that we could really use." (Alternative Press)
    The rock group, Iron Maiden sings in their song "The Number of the Beast" — "666, the number of the beast, 666, the one for your and me". Shirts such as "666 Volunteer", "666", and "Route 666" are being worn by "eager and ready" young people. Craig Dees, in the World & I, says:
    Today's implantable microchip devices used for identifying animals are the precursors of devices that may monitor, report on, and even regulate a spectrum of conditions in the bodies of animals and humans. . . Implantable microchip devices offer many exciting possibilities in the fields of medicine and scientific research, as well as for general use involving, for example, credit card numbers or passport identification. . .
    I can see in the near future putting my hand over a grocery store sensor that reads my credit chip and automatically debits my account for the purchase. Considering the burdensome number of cards, identifications, and licenses I carry now, I would have no problem with placing my Social Security number, credit access, passport, and driver's license on a microchip implanted in me.
    (Craig Dees, "Watching From Inside", The World & I, Feb. 01, 1998, p. 150)
    Paul Somerson writes in PC Computing:
    "How’d you like to avoid waiting in lines for the rest of your life? Breeze through everywhere like you owned the place. Watch lights snap on, doors open automatically, money pop out of ATMs as you approach. Never have to show an ID, buy a ticket, carry keys, remember a password. You’d leave stores loaded with packages and waltz right past the cashiers. You wouldn’t have to carry a wallet. Ever. Family and friends could find you instantly in any crowd. There’s only one catch—you’d need to have a tiny little chip implanted in your body. No big deal. . .
    (Paul Somerson, "Inside Job", PC Computing, Oct. 1999, p. 87)
    A very informative "Mark of the Beast" "spoof" was recently staged on the Internet by Bill Cross.
    Bill wanted to try his hand at setting up a website. Bill decided for his first project, "a spoof website of a company peddling the mark of the beast". So Global Monetary was created with the advertising "Become an ID chip member and Receive $250!". Not wanting to cause real panic, Bill admittedly laced the site, "with enough clues so that anyone who scrutinized it would know it wasn't for real and would therefor not panic." Bill was surprized, "On the first full day of operation the site had more that 4,200 distinct user sessions averaging 6 minutes each".
    Realizing things were getting "out of hand", after just four days, Bill "pulled the plug" on Global Monetary.
    Bill also made this "alarming" statement, "I realized that I was getting another kind of visitor to the site: People who actually wanted to receive the mark of the beast just to get in on the IPO. I was totally blind-sided by that. I never expected that to happen. . ."
    CNN conducted a poll on Jan. 14, 1999, and asked the question: "Would you consider having microchips implanted in your body?"
    Here's the "surprizing" results of the CNN Poll:
    CNN POLL conducted Jan. 14, 1999


    Would you consider having microchips implanted in your body?
    Yes 47% 4663 votes
    No  53% 5329 votes
    Total:  9992 votes
    What's really amazing. . . So many are willing to "receive" what they "believe" to be the mark of the beast and, according to the Word of God, whoever receives the mark of the beast "shall drink of the wine of the wrath of God, and be tormented with fire and brimstone for ever and ever!

    And the third angel followed them, saying with a loud voice, If any man worship the beast and his image, and receive his mark in his forehead, or in his hand,
    The same shall drink of the wine of the wrath of God, which is poured out without mixture into the cup of his indignation; and he shall be tormented with fire and brimstone in the presence of the holy angels, and in the presence of the Lamb:
    And the smoke of their torment ascendeth up for ever and ever: and they have no rest day nor night, who worship the beast and his image, and whosoever receiveth the MARK of his name.
    Revelation 14:9-11
    What a mockery and ridicule of a Holy God! It's bad now — can you imagine what the tribulation will be like? When the "salt of the earth" — the Christians will be removed! When the Antichrist will dazzle the world with his "signs and wonders", prosperity, peace — the world will be "jumping with joy" in anticipation to worship the Beast and receive "his mark"!
    God help you, if you're reading this and have not received the Lord Jesus Christ as your personal Saviour. All these incredible technologies and events are not just happening — they're EXACTLY as the Lord said!
    Are there plans to biochip humans?
    Yes. . .
    New York Times, June 20, 1999 "We get calls all the time: 'Is this available for children?' " said Paul McMahon, a spokesman for the LoJack Corporation, based in Dedham, Mass., which markets a positioning device that has helped track down 30,000 stolen cars. People also frequently ask about using LoJacks for an elderly relative who might be suffering from Alzheimer's disease or other disorienting ailments, said Mr. McMahon. . .
    "It's inevitable [biochipping of humans]," said Arthur Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania. "Why? Because there's a level of concern, some based in fact, some based in fear, about the loss of children, about kids being stolen in custody disputes, about terrorism, about kidnapping, that leads people to be frantic about wanting to know where other people they care about are."

    PC Computing, Oct. 1999, p. 87
    Paul Somerson, "Inside Job" "How’d you like to avoid waiting in lines for the rest of your life? Breeze through everywhere like you owned the place. Watch lights snap on, doors open automatically, money pop out of ATMs as you approach. Never have to show an ID, buy a ticket, carry keys, remember a password. You’d leave stores loaded with packages and waltz right past the cashiers. You wouldn’t have to carry a wallet. Ever. Family and friends could find you instantly in any crowd. There’s only one catch—you’d need to have a tiny little chip implanted in your body. No big deal. . .
    How will they convince people to implant these chips? First, they’ll hype the convenience of leaving your keys, credit cards, and money at home. Then they’ll automate everything from cash registers to tollbooths so if you’re chipped you can zoom through in a digital carpool lane." (PC Computing, Oct. 1999, p. 87)

    Time magazine,April 27, 1998, pp. 50,51:

    A single electronic card may replace everything in your wallet including. . .

    . . . your cash
    . . . your credit cards
    . . . your ATM card
    . . . your ID cards
    . . . your insurance
    . . . and your life
    FUTURE One card, or one chip, with your life on it. Time also writes, "Your daughter can store money any way she wants – on her laptop, on a debit card, even (in the not too distant future) on a chip implanted under her skin." (Time, April 27, 1998, p. 51)

    Popular Science, July 1995 p. 74 - E-Money
    "If we had our way, we’d implant a chip behind everyone’s ear in the maternity ward," says Ronald Kane, a vice president of Cubic Corp.’s automatic revenue collection group. Cubic is the leading maker of smart card systems for mass transit systems, highway tolls, parking, and other applications and one of a number of companies and government agencies pushing the frontier of smart cards — the money of the future. (E-Money (Popular Science, July 1995 p. 74)

    Brainticklers II, Beyond Y2K—Questions for the New Millennium and the Year 3000, Supplement to Business 2.0, December 1999, p. 14
    "What electronic devices will we choose to insert into our bodies?"

    Automatic I.D. News, April 1996, p.6
    Mark David, Editor-in-Chief, "Satan Big Brother and other uses of Auto. ID"
    "Bar coding people doesn't make sense, but tracking them via RF/ID tags or biometrics does — in many cases. The time has come for a logical debate about the ethics of coding people.
    The problem is, logic and efficiency cannot be our sole guides in this matter. Is there any 'logical' reason for not wanting to tag humans with RF/ID chips? (Automatic I.D. News, April 1996, p.6)

    Network World, August, 31, 1998
    Fred McClimans, A chip in his shoulder But look on the bright side: Who wouldn't want to stop worrying about where they put their keys or Mobil Speed Pass? And no more remembering pesky PINs, passwords or social-security numbers. Medical information could also be dumped onto your forearm chip. We could even probably away with those pesky "home arrest" bracelets used to monitor the criminal element in their own homes (imagine how different the Caine Mutiny would have been if Queeg had had chips in all of his crew - no strawberry problem there!).
    So perhaps the answer is to use this type of new bio-security device to accurately track information regarding what we are doing, and who is to accurately track information regarding what we are doing, and who is actually doing it. . . Let's say we all get together and implant everybody with these new chips.
    Are they safe? Sure — they've been using variations to track dogs for some time now.
    Sadly, I think the answer is chips. Let's face it, the potential value is too great. . .

    ABC Good Morning America, August, 30, 1998
    Part Man, Part Machine Aaron Brown interviews Kevin Warwick, the first verfied human chip implant
    AARON BROWN: But I think what people are scared to death of, frankly, is that this is the beginning [Warwick's test biochip implant] of how governments — yours, mine, whose ever — who controls us all. We put these little microchips in.

    Popular Mechanics, "A Century of Technology", January 2000, p. 63 However, if technology follows its current trends, this may all be moot. Becoming ever more compact and powerful, how long before hardware as we know it disappears completely from sight, replaced by nanotechnology and bioimplants that plug directly into body and brain?

    Scientific American, "Rise of the Robots", December, 1999, p. 124 Alert pundits now foresee a world saturated with powerful computer chips, which will increasingly insinuate themselves into our gadgets, dwellings, apparel and even our bodies.

    Yahoo! Internet Life, "Be patient", December 1999, p. 132 By 2007, your entire medical history, including the sequence of your genome, will be stored on a data card in your wallet, or in a bracelet on your wrist, or on a chip in your earlobe.

    Business 2.0, "The Web Within Us", December 1999, p. 173 By the second half of the next century, there will be no clear distinction between human and machine intelligence. Two things will allow this to happen. First, our biological brains will be enhanced by neural implants. This has already begun. Doctors use neural implants to counteract symptoms of Parkinson's disease, for instance, and neuroscientists from Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta recently placed an electrode into the brain of a paralyzed stroke victim who now communicates using a PC.

    Forbes, Sept. 22, 1997 Computers/Communications
    Ann March, No place to hide TYPICAL AMERICAN FAMILY, c. 2008. Above their home, foot-long robot airplanes patrol several hundred feet up, on the lookout for criminals and even casual pot smokers. Both family cars are equipped with global-positioning satellite receivers and locator beacons. . . The parents, the kids and the dogs all have microchips under their skin with ID and medical data. . .
    The potential loss of privacy leaves Dr. Stevens uneasy, he concedes, but there is no better way to insure the accuracy of a person's medical records. He thinks it inevitable that microchips with medical information will become common in humans, possibly inserted under the skin of the upper arm.

    A&E (Arts and Entertainment Cable Channel)
    The Story of Money, (two-hour program aired 1999): Narrator: Everyday trillions of dollars are moved in less time than it takes you to screw up your transaction at the automated teller machine. More and more money is going digital. . . Some imagine everything you own will one day be tied to a single, easy to use card, or even in a computer chip, implanted in your skin. . .
    Narrator: The E-money future, however, isn't necessarily secure. The Internet wasn't built to be Fort Knox. In the wrong hands, this powerful tool can turn dangerous. Hackers have already broken into bank files that were 100% secure. One cyber-pirate downloaded 20,000 credit card numbers, courtesy of the phone company.
    Frank Abagnale (Forgery Expert): The problem is, if we have such tremendous fraud with paper we can only expect even much bigger frauds with electronics. In electronics you're dealing with people from all over the world that have access through computers and the internet to thousands of accounts and there's really no way of making the system foolproof.
    Narrator: E-money entrepreneurs are hoping to solve the problem of safeguards with even more electronics.
    Unidentified banker: The golden rule in banking is know thy customer.
    Narrator: Know thy customer, and then scan their eyeballs into a computer. Your eyes are like fingerprints and by recording them, a company can confirm your identity and your bank balance.
    Narrator: But how far will it go. Pretty far, actually.
    Neil Marcous (EDS): You'll simply have the chip embedded. You'll do a retina scan or some other kind of bio-scan, you'll validate who you are, you'll have your information, it'll transmit and you can conduct all your business, literally against a ledger, an electronic ledger somewhere.
    Note: If anyone knows the Future of electronic money, it would be the people at EDS. Over 90% of all electronic payments travel through EDS — over 25,000 transactions every 5 minutes!
    Narrator: Did you say embedded?
    Neil Marcous (EDS): Well, it could be embedded any number of places, for sake of artistic license, let's say it was embedded under your skin up above your left eyebrow.

    Automatic I.D. News, September 1991, p.E35
    "Monetary Union, Already a reality at Eurocheck"
    "The EC card is more than just a check guarantee card; it may also be used with a personal identification number (PIN) in automated teller machines (ATM). . .
    But what is the future of the EC card? A chip, of course! (Automatic I.D. News, "Monetary Union, Already a reality at Eurocheck", September 1991, p.E35

    Privacy and Freedon, Alan F. Westin, 1967

    "As the microelectronic circuits and microminiature components now available in space work and laboratory experiments filter into general use, such tags will become available in much smaller sizes, increasing still further the possibilities for secreting them in an individual's clothing or his personal and professional accessories. Receiving or scanning units will also grow more powerful and smaller, making it easier for investigators to carry them in concealed form on their persons.
    . . . Invisible magnetic-ink tattoos might be applied (for example, to babies at birth) to provide permanent identification of every individual; these might possibly be used also for locating a subject. Existing microminiaturized transmitters the size of a pinhead might be coded with an identification number, enclosed in a permanent capsule, and implanted under the skin by a simple and painless surgical operation." (Privacy and Freedon, Alan F. Westin, 1967, pp. 85-86)

    The Oprah Winfrey Show
    Your Life in the Year 2000 (February 25, 1994)
    Note: The guest, Ms. Faith Popcorn is from Trend Tracker.
    Ms. Popcorn: . . . it's going to be kind of a more controlled future.
    Oprah: But the question is, will violence still be running our lives and will the schools be any better?
    Ms. Popcorn: No, because I. . .
    Oprah: Will we treat each other better?
    Ms. Popcorn: Well, we may not treat each other any better, but we can get over it faster. As far as violence goes, we're going to have little chips — as a privacy issue — implanted in us. So we — you know, we'll be tracking. You'll be able to track a child that disappears and get them back globally so that — because we'll all have our little memory chip.

    Marin Independent Journal, April 2, 1989 p.A10
    Future Shocker: 'Biochip' 'Science fiction' technology here
    "Don’t reach for our wallet at the check-out counter. After your food items have been priced, tallied and bagged, simply pass your hand over the computer code scanner used on the groceries, and the bill will be automatically deducted from your checking account. . .
    Most likely. . . it would be implanted on the back of the right or left hand for convience, so that it would be easy to scan.(Marin Independent Journal, April 2, 1989 p.A10)

    Time Enough? Consequences of Human Microchip Implantation, Elaine M. Ramesh
    Franklin Pierce Law Institute web site
    "However, proving that old adage that there is nothing new under the sun, the concept [biochips] may be attributed to far earlier authors. The Book of Revelation of the Bible contains the following statement: 'He also forced everyone, small and great, to receive a mark on his right hand or on his forehead, so that no one could buy or sell unless he had the mark, which is the name of the beast or the number of his name.' Revelation 13:16-17. That mark could well be the microchip implant." (Time Enough? Consequences of Human Microchip Implantation, Elaine M. Ramesh Franklin Pierce Law Institute web site)

    Denver Post, September 2, 1995
    Chip envisioned to curb inmates ". . .the technology of the future might enable authorities to implant microchips into the heads of convicted felons as a way to handle prisoners."
    New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson

    FROM Parascope:
    Dr. Daniel Man, on the other hand, holds the first patent in the United States for a homing device designed specifically for implantation in humans. Man had the idea for this device "while I was a resident in plastic surgery and I kept seeing on TV all those stories about missing and abducted children." Man's device was designed for use in conjunction with a network of existing communications satellites, which would locate the implantee via triangulation. (Parascope)

    Wired, January, 2000, p. 162
    Within 20 years, there will be no avoiding MEMS: [Micro Electro Mechanical Systems] They will be in every telecom line, computer, and coffeemaker — even our own bodies. (Wired, January, 2000, p. 162)

    Excerpts from a speech to the 1994 IBM Health Care Executive Conference by Mary Jane England, MD, a member of the executive committee of the White House Health Project and president of the Washington Business Group on Health. (source The New American, July 24, 1994) "The smart card is a wonderful idea, but even better would be the capacity not to have a card, and I call it 'a chip in your ear,' that would actually access your medical records, so that no matter where you were we would have some capacity to access that medical record. We need to go beyond the narrow conceptualization of the smart card and really use some of the technology that's out there. . . I don't think that computerized, integrated medical records with a capacity to access through a chip in your ear is so far off and I think we need to think of these things."

    The Washington Times, October, 05, 1998, p. A21
    David Oderberg, He's got it under his skin But what we do know is that proponents of this technology [biochips] envisage first using it on animals (now widespread, particularly dogs, cats and cattle), then prisoners (more effective than electronic ankle tags), then children (e.g., newborn babies, so as to prevent their being switched or lost) and elderly people suffering from Alzheimer's disease (to prevent their wandering and getting lost).
    After that, who knows? The potential for the chips to replace credit cards and cash is huge, and will tempt financial institutions in turn to tempt their customers to "try out" the chip with no obligation to carry it permanently, and monetary rewards for those who persevere.
    Supporters of the injectable microchip say it is just the logical extension of a technology that already allows the heavy monitoring of people through pagers, cellular phones, "smart" cards and cars fitted with Global Positioning System transponders.

    The Digital Economy, Don Tapscott, pp.275-276 There are now chips that can be inserted into breast implants. Perhaps chips would be inserted into other parts of peoples' bodies for nonmedical reasons. We could track repeat offender pedophiles, or repeat offenders in general, or offenders in general, or maybe just offensive people. Microprocessor-based products can be attached to children to discourage abduction or locate missing kids. What about chips in children for extra and permanent safety?

    PC Week, Vision 2000 Special Report, January, 3, 2000, p.42
    The office of tomorrow A chip embedded underneath the skin of your hand serves as your identification for personal and professional transactions.

    The Birmingham News, January 2, 2000, p. 4J
    Josh Calder, In the 21st century, our luggage will be smarter and tougher A lost passport will mean less when travelers can wear an anklet, ring, or patch that contains all ID information, medical records and perhaps some e-cash. The truly worried can get implantable ID chips; either way, a traveler could have his movements tracked in real time by satellite.

    Popular Mechanics, January 2000, "Famous Americans Predict the Future", p. 22
    Sharyl Attkisson, CBS Television Correspondent " . . . We certainly aren't carrying around cash. Instead, each person wears a tiny computerlike device in a ring, or has it painlessly tattooed into his skin."

    Who Knows: Safeguarding Your Privacy in a Networked World, Ann Cavoukian and Don Tapscott, p.83, 84 Such a microchip [biochip implant] may strike some of you as a gimmick, but two doctors in the United States recently had a microchip containing their respective medical histories implanted in their bodies, as part of a trial.House pets in Europe and North America are routinely implanted with microchips that identify their owners.
    When a group of internationally renowned privacy experts met to discuss the privacy implications of the information highway, they expressed concern that 'these tracking systems [biochip implants] will be adapted to humans. The conversion would not be difficult'. Among the many who shared this view was Simon Davies, the director general of Privacy Internationl, who was dismayed that a number of professionals he had spoken to would not object to such a tracking system. . .
    Today, it may seem far-fetched, but how long before the microchip embedded in the beast implant and the transponder carried by children are merged into one unit? How long before one device can be implanted into our bodies to identify and track us, and to transmit this information electronically to a central database?

    PC Magazine, June 22, 1999, pp.142, 145 Regardless of whether you like it or even know it, you have already established a digital identity. That identity is a constantly growing and shifting amalgam of your personal information, stored in the databases of state and municipal offices, hospitals and medical centers, insurance companies, stores, banks, and more federal agencies than we can imagine. That shifting, inchoate digital identity is destined to become much more "real." It will be sharply defined because you will construct and control your own digital persona, carrying it with you, embedded in a microchip, at all times.
    The growing use of smart cards, especially outside the U.S., paves the way for their acceptance as standard security devices. A smart card, whether in conjunction with passwords or biometric data, can help protect your digital identity by letting you carry that identity embedded in the chip on your own card, rather than have to store the identifying information in databases scattered across or linked via the Internet. In the future, those chips will be embedded in our clothes and perhaps eventually in our bodies.

    MetroActive News, December 12-18, 1996
    Michael Mechanic, Beastly Implants

    Implanted ID tags have become all the rage for saving precious pets. Internal homing devices have the ability to thwart kidnappers. Now that the future has arrived, would you prefer your chip in your wrist or forehead?. . .
    Within the next decade, human implants are almost certain to become available, too. . .
    And technology watchers believe it's only a matter of time before we, too, will carry implants.

    USA Today, June 6, 1995
    Mike Snider, Embedded electronics, a chip off sci-fi In the near future, people may have chips implanted under their skin with medical history information, even X-ray and MRI images, says chip designer Fadi J. Kurdahi, University of California-Irvine.

    Philadelphia Inquirer, January 21, 1996:
    "Thirty years from now, chips will be implanted in our bodies encoded with credit card, passport, driver's license and other personal information. We'd no longer have to worry about leaving home without it."

    Noah Webster, Southwest Radio Church:
    This past month I received a copy of a confidential report from an IBM affiliate regarding testing of implanted computer chips in prisoners without their knowledge. It could be determined where they went, with whom they talked, details of their conversations, how long they slept how much they exercised, etc. The only problem encountered was that the prisoners experienced nose bleeds, and the comment was that this problem would have to be solved before wider experimentation could be engaged.

    Electronic Telegraph, March, 1999 "Just three years ago I put forward the notion that chip implants inside humans would become commonplace and as desirable as mobile phones. I also postulated that they would require telecommunication facilities. Well, the latest pacemakers now have a short-hop radio link, and in the past month there have been reports of paraplegics with silicon brain implants able to control computers, and artificial retinas restoring sufficient sight for someone totally blind to recognize letters of the alphabet. Most likely the next five years will see people with chip implants as commonplace."

    Newsbytes News Network, August 27, 1998
    Sylvia Dennis, UK Professor Implants Chip, Turns Himself Into Cyborg "In five years' time, we will be able to do chips with all sorts of information on them. They could be used for money transfers, medical records, passports, driving licenses, and loyalty cards. And if they are implanted they are impossible to steal. The potential is enormous,"
    Kevin Warwick, the first "verified" human biochip implant

    The Straits Times
    In 10 years you will have . . . a chip in your head
    Take out your wallet and count the number of cards you carry, not to mention all the Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) that you have to memorize for every possible transaction. . .
    Everything from employment and medical records to financial status can be written into the chip. Add a short-range wireless transmitter-receiver, implant the whole thing under your skin, and you have a personal transponder, just like those in airplanes. . . Even grocery-shopping could be easier. Just walk into a store and pick up whatever you want to buy. No more queues at the cashier's counter.
    All this could be reality in a few years time.

    The World & I, Feb. 01, 1998, p. 150
    Craig Dees, Watching From Inside Today's implantable microchip devices used for identifying animals are the precursors of devices that may monitor, report on, and even regulate a spectrum of conditions in the bodies of animals and humans. . .
    Implantable microchip devices offer many exciting possibilities in the fields of medicine and scientific research, as well as for general use involving, for example, credit card numbers or passport identification. . .
    I can see in the near future putting my hand over a grocery store sensor that reads my credit chip and automatically debits my account for the purchase. Considering the burdensome number of cards, identifications, and licenses I carry now, I would have no problem with placing my Social Security number, credit access, passport, and driver's license on a microchip implanted in me.

    Chicago Tribune, May 7, 1996, p.1
    John Van, In Future, Tiny Chip May Get Under Skin A tiny chip implanted inside the human body to send and receive radio messages, long a popular delusion among paranoids, is likely to be marketed as a consumer item early in the next century. . .
    "This is currently very hot," said Edward Cornish, president of the World Future Society, based in Bethesda, Md. "The field is developing because the technology is becoming available to do it."
    Although potential problems are huge, locator ID chips may be inevitable, said Cornish of the World Future Society.
    Cornish believes, at least initially, that such chips would be voluntary. But he acknowledges that "things that are voluntary today have a way of becoming compulsory tomorrow.

    Forbes ASAP "Is all this a good thing? Certainly many people are nervous about the privacy issues involved. . .What parent wouldn't sympathize with the idea of implanting a chip to enable the police to track a lost or abducted toddler?"

    Popular Science; August 1997, p.53
    In the near future, watches may be old hat. Future cool may be a programmable LCD that tells time while implanted under a layer of skin. That's the possibility raised by a patent issued to Interval Research Cor., a high-tech lab in Palo Alto, California, funded by Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen, among others.
    The device, called a programmable subcutaneous visible implant, would be close enough to the skin's surface for the display to be read easily. A control chip and a battery would be the other elements. Holding your wrist next to an external charger would replenish the battery.
    The device might also prove itself valuable in other areas; the health field offers particular potential, says inventor Andrew Singer of Interval. In one application, the implant might allow individuals to monitor their temperature or blood pressure at any time.
    While the implant is not actively being developed for commercial use at the moment, Interval sees further possibilities—perhaps even in the fashion industry. So don't even think about body piercing — it'll soon be pass. The trend is toward a watch you'll never lose.

    Futurist, January - February 1996, p. 11
    The Cyber Future Infotech will be implanted in our bodies.
    A chip implanted somewhere in our bodies might serve as a combination credit card, passport, driver's license, personal diary, and you name it. No longer would we worry about losing our credit cards while traveling. A chip inserted into our bodies might also give us extra mental power.